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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Billroth I gastric resection found in the catalog.

Billroth I gastric resection

Horace Greeley Moore

Billroth I gastric resection

with particular reference to the surgery of peptic ulcer

by Horace Greeley Moore

  • 350 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Little, Brown in Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Peptic Ulcer -- surgery.,
  • Stomach -- surgery.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 151-165.

    Statementby Horace G. Moore, Jr. and Henry N. Harkins.
    ContributionsHarkins, Henry Nelson, 1905-1967.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxx, 175 p. :
    Number of Pages175
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14732519M
    LC Control Number53011894

    GASTRIC RESECTIONS Partial Gastric Resection A PG may be used in the treatment of ulcers that are resistant to standard therapy, ulcers that continue to recur despite aggressive treatment or ulcers that cause Post-Gastrectomy: Managing the Nutrition Fall-Out NUTRITION ISSUES IN GASTROENTEROLOGY, SERIES #18 Carol Rees Parrish, R.D., MS, Series File Size: 1MB. Eighteen cancers of the gastric remnant after resection for peptic ulcer are reviewed. Current views on the etiology and pathogenesis of this malignancy are described, as a prolonged exposure of the gastric mucosa to alkaline juices seems to create a precancerous by:

    What happens in a gastric resection? Vagotomy. What type of surgery involves resectioning of the vagus nerve? Treatment of peptic ulcers (lowers acid production) What is a vagotomy used to treat? What happens in a billroth II gastric surgery? Billroth I gastric surgery. Billroth II, more formally Billroth's operation II, is an operation in which a partial gastrectomy (removal of the stomach) is performed and the cut end of the stomach is closed. The greater curvature of the stomach (not involved with the previous closure of the stomach) is then connected to the first part of the jejunum in end-to-side anastomosis. The Billroth II always follows resection of ICDCM:

      Current status of technique for Billroth-I anastomosis in totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer Shun Zhang 1,2, Tetsu Fukunaga 1 1 Department of Gastroenterology and Minimally Invasive Surgery, Juntendo University Hospital, Tokyo , Japan. Clinic of the Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Billroth had his assistants work out the technical details of the pro-cedure of gastric resection in the animal laboratory. They were able to demonstrate that survival was un-doubtedly possible and eliminated the question .


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Billroth I gastric resection by Horace Greeley Moore Download PDF EPUB FB2

Billroth I. The Billroth I operation is a type of reconstruction after a partial gastrectomy in which the stomach is anastomosed to the duodenum (Fig.

31 The gastric resection is usually limited to the antrum, and a truncal vagotomy is often performed in conjunction with the resection. The gastroduodenostomy anastomosis is found toward the greater curvature.

The Billroth I procedure consists of removal of the distal stomach including the pylorus, followed by gastroduodenostomy to reestablish gastrointestinal continuity. While antrectomy refers to extirpation of the antrum alone, the typical Billroth I resection includes an extensive resection of the body of the stomach in the area of the lesser Cited by: 1.

This Journal. Back; Journal Home; Online First; Current Issue; All Issues; Special Issues; About the journal; Journals.

Back; The Lancet; The Lancet Child Author: V.J. Downie. Get this from a library. The Billroth I gastric resection, with particular reference to the surgery of peptic ulcer.

[Horace Greeley Moore; Henry N Harkins]. The first large gastric resection with reconstruction was described by Theodor Billroth in Gastric resection by Billroth 1.

Billroth 1 gastric resection is a circular excision of the antrum and pyloric stomach, the application of an anastomosis between the stump of the stomach and the duodenum of the “end to end” type.

Currently, Israeli surgeons use this method with a modification of Gaberer II. The Billroth I resection for gastric carcinoma has its advocates and detractors; we have no set convictions concerning this problem. Finally, we believe that there is merit in the conversion of a Billroth II to I anastomosis for the treatment of severe by: 1.

The Billroth I Gastric Resection: Experimental Studies and Clinical Observations on Cases. *This work was aided by a Grant-in-Aid from the National Institutes of Health (G) and by Initiative Research Funds of the State of Washington.

This article has been cited by other articles in by: A gastric remnant carcinoma is defined as a carcinoma arising in the stomach remnant following previous Billroth II partial gastrectomy for benign disease, most frequently peptic ulcer by:   The gastric remnant endoscopic findings were normal in % of the Roux-en-Y group and in 18% of the Billroth II group (P.

This report is submitted to present the current findings of the follow-up studies of Billroth I type of subtotal gastric resections done over a period of seven and one-half years (). The clinical studies reported here are supplemented by experimental data comparing the results of the Cited by: 7.

The Billroth I procedure for gastroduodenostomy is the most physiologic type of gastric resection, since it restores normal continuity.

Although long preferred by some in the treatment of gastric ulcer or antral carcinoma, its use for duodenal ulcer has been less popular. Fig—Distributionac¬ cording to specific tech¬ nique of the Billroth I operations for benign disease in our series.

resection was years. Sixty-eight per cent of the patients had symptoms for five years or longer, while eighty-threeper cent of the patients had symptoms of gastro¬ duodenal disease for more than one year.

Those patients who had resections and had symptoms for less Cited by: 7. Billroth I, more formally Billroth's operation I, is an operation in which the pylorus is removed and the distal stomach is anastomosed directly to the duodenum.

The operation is most closely associated with Theodor Billroth, but was first described by Polish surgeon Ludwik Rydygier. The surgical procedure is called a :   Distal Gastrectomy with Billroth I or Billroth Ii Reconstruction Rudolf Bumm J.

Rüdiger Siewert Partial gastrectomies consist of the removal of the distal portion of the stomach. According to the type of disease (ulcer or carcinoma) and the location of the basic disease (duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, high-gastric ulcer), they are performed as antral, two-thirds.

Buy The Billroth 1 gastric resection, with particular reference to the surgery of peptic ulcer by Moore, Horace Greeley (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low Author: Horace Greeley Moore. The first successful gastrectomy was performed by Theodor Billroth in for cancer of the stomach.

Historically, gastrectomies were used to treat peptic ulcers. These are now usually treated with antibiotics, as it was recognized that they are usually due to Helicobacter pylori infection or chemical imbalances in the gastric :   The Gastric tumor was resected with pylorus in a dog.

The Gastric tumor was resected with pylorus in a dog. Skip navigation Sign in. Billroth I in a Dog (pylorus resection) Atsushi Fujita. In a follow‐up study of patients, who were subjected to Billroth II resection for duodenal ulcer, the incidence and mortality of gastric carcinoma in a 22–30 year follow‐up period were determined.

Among the survivors traced, underwent gastroscopy and biopsy but carcinomas of the gastric Cited by: Billroth II gastrojejunostomy shares some pros and cons with the Billroth I and Roux-en-Y methods.

It enables a wide stomach resection without anastomotic tension and is relatively easy during laparoscopic surgery. However, postoperative bile reflux into the remnant stomach is more frequent, and, although rare, afferent loop syndrome can : Satoshi Kanda, Tetsu Fukunaga.

Currently, most Billroth II procedures are done for resection of distal gastric cancers and involve antrectomy and creation of a gastrojejunostomy.

The result is an end (stomach)-to-side (jejunum) anastomosis with two jejunal lumens (Fig.A, B) immediately beyond the gastric staple line. The selection of an anastomosis method after a distal gastrectomy is a highly debatable topic; however, the available documentation lacks the necessary research based on a comparison of early postoperative complications.

This study was conducted to investigate the difference of early postoperative complications between Billroth I and Billroth II types of anastomosis for distal Cited by: A variety of options following partial gastrectomy are available to restore gastrointestinal continuity, the most common of which are the Billroth I, Billroth II, and Roux-en-Y reconstructions.

The indications and techniques for partial gastric resection and reconstruction, perioperative .